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Robert Haddon

Distinguished Professor of Chemistry
Watch research videoDistinguished Professor of Chemical and Environmental Engineering
Director, Center for Nanoscale Science & Engineering
Robert 
Haddon

Areas of Expertise

Areas of Expertise:
  • Nanotechnology
  • Organic electronic materials
  • Superconductivity in alkali-metal-doped carbon-60
  • Carbon materials for advanced applications, including carbon nanotubes
College: Department: Affiliations: Press Release / Article: Profile:

Select Honors and Distinctions

  • James C. McGroddy Prize for New Materials, American Physical Society (2008)
  • Fellow, Royal Australian Chemical Institute (1998)
  • Fellow, American Physical Society (1996)
  • Fellow, American Association for the Advancement of Science (1993)
  • Person of the Year, Superconductor Week (1991)
  • Queen Elizabeth II Fellow (1973-75)
  • Highly Cited author in chemistry, physics and materials science (ISI)

Research Summary

The electronic structure and properties of molecules and materials, with particular emphasis on transport, magnetism, superconductivity, device fabrication and miniaturization, and the discovery of new classes of materials.

Q&A

Q: Where will nanotechnology have the biggest impact on 21st century challenges?
Applying nanotechnology to solving our healthcare and electronics problems has potentially huge effects, particularly on global health and security. The major nanotechnology research breakthroughs expected in the next decade to help make this happen will be in graphene electronics, 3D-electronics, spintronics and superconductivity.

Q: How is UCR contributing to these solutions?
UCR is home to one of the world’s foremost centers in nanotechnology research. The Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering supports research in next generation electronics, with particular emphasis on the use of carbon materials. The brand new $56 million Materials Science and Engineering building on campus has state-of-the-art clean room facilities and equipment for nanotechnology research. With the U.S. and California the home of Silicon Valley and the electronics industry, our strengths contribute to the leadership role California and the U.S. play in creating a healthier, more sustainable, more secure and prosperous world.

Q: To which research areas is UCR’s Center for Nanoscale Science and Engineering turning its focus?
It would surely be next generation electronics. Our excellence in graphene research would facilitate our move into 3D electronics. We are interested also in new ways of packaging electronics and in developing new materials, devices and architectures.

Q: How did you become an expert in nanotechnology?
Though I trained as a chemist, early in my career with AT &T (Lucent) Bell Laboratories I was applying my knowledge to materials research as a Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff in the Materials Chemistry Research Department. My interest in advanced carbon materials led to the preparation of the first soluble single-walled carbon nanotubes, allowing the study of carbon metals and semiconductors in solutions. That led to my founding two companies that manufactured carbon nanotubes for advanced applications. I continue to be interested in the electronic structure and properties of molecules and materials and the discovery of new classes of electronic materials.

Q: What advice do you give students interested in this field?
A simple one: Get a good education in chemistry, physics, engineering and mathematics.
Robert Haddon "My interest in advanced carbon materials led to the preparation of the first soluble single-walled carbon nanotubes, allowing the study of carbon metals and semiconductors in solutions."

—Robert Haddon